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June 2006

THE LAKE HOUSE

By Krista Vitola

THE LAKE HOUSE

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Distributor: Warner Bros.
Director: Alejandro Agresti
Screenwriter: David Auburn, based on Il Mare by Kim Eun-Jeong & Yeo Ji-na
Cinematographer: Alar Kivilo
Composer: Rachel Portman
Cast: Keanu Reeves, Sandra Bullock, Shoreh Aghdashloo, Scott Elias, Dylan Walsh, Christopher Plummer


   

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“A Love Story that Reaches Across Time” – a perfect concept for the movie The Lake House, which featured Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock as two people who fall in love but are unable to be with each other because of time. As stated about the film, this comment was a great concept and might have even been a hit, but unfortunately, it fell a little short of its inspiring notion.

After watching a film, one must consider all of the possible reactions when leaving the theatre: joy, rage, empathy, sadness, and at times, sheer satisfaction. But after viewing this film, the only reaction received was that of confusion. Parts were missing; the story line just was not flowing as it was supposed to. Some things just didn’t fit; and one has to guess why Bullock would just get up and do certain things in the movie. And while clinging to every part of the film, hoping that things would get better, clearer, the realization hit that no one was going to get the information they so desperately wanted, needed to fully understand.

Most of us are drawn to romantic films, because if gives us those ideal endings we long for in our own lives, that perfect person, and no matter what happens whether it be with other people, mother nature, or even time itself, we make it happen, because as always: love conquers all. And it was with this notion that many go to see films such as The Lake House, knowing that there would be those gushy moments between the characters, the longing deprivation of each other’s being, and the knowledge that now more than ever they knew that they had found the one. Throughout the film, the connection between the characters, especially Bullock and Reeves, was flawless. Their relationship blossomed as the film went on and with a great supporting cast including Christopher Plummer, who plays Reeve’s father, and Shohreh Aghdashloo, who is one of Bullock’s coworkers, the connection between all was very warm and unified. It was an ideal cast of individuals, each knowing and complementing the others style. All the relationships felt deep and real, which added to the film’s jumbled story line.

Mr. Alejandro Agresti, who directed the film and has done films such as La Cruz, had done a wonderful job creating a picturesque atmosphere for the characters to interact within. Don’t get me wrong, the concept of the film was something different, unique, and altogether touching, but something must have happened between the editing of the film and its opening that slipped through the cracks of those working on its production. A little drawn out at times, this film might have been a full success if only met with a little tweaking.